R6 Message Net banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
yeah, so how long can a full tank of gas sit in my tank until it goes bad? it's sorta below freezing (30's F) around where i am right now and it just snowed today, my bike's under the cover. i was planning on doing all the winterizing before i leave for winter break, which is in 2 weeks from today. i've had the full tank of gas since a week ago.. am I still good? or should i add in the sta-bil now?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,460 Posts
Go ahead and add the stablizing, it won't hurt. Fuel takes a little bit to start lacouring (sp) but it won't hurt to get ahead of the game
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
The shelf life of gasoline, before it oxidizes, depends largely upon the octane and quality of the gasoline as well as the ambient temperature. Premium lasts longer than regular and ethanol even shorter because alcohol mixes easily with water. Gasoline typically has a shelf life of six to 12 months, depending on conditions. Higher temperatures are more damaging to fuel stability since the heat vaporizes the lighter components from the mixture.

I use Sta-Bil which is i think probably the best brand of stabilizer


:thumbup
 

·
Converted to the Darkside
Joined
·
175 Posts
yeah, just top it up and add some stabilizer. then go for at least a 5 minute ride to get the stabilizer through the whole system. then go home, lift up the tank, turn off the petcock, and run the bike until it dies. by running the carbs/FInjectors dry there's nothing in them to gum up.

pull your battery and keep charging it periodically to prevent having to buy a new one in the spring.

ideally all fluids should be changed on an annual basis. coolant starts to go bad and it won't cool as well when it gets old. brake fluid gets nasty too. the more oil changes you do, the better, as transmission and cylinder oil are shared on the R6. frequent oil changes mean that the gears that are slowly getting ground down in in the transmission, or the crank's movements aren't generating that congealed metal paste that gives you cylinder wear. all fluids are very simple to change, so do it if you want your motor to last.

i make a list of everything that i did to store the bike and tape it to the tank, so that when it comes time to start it up, i'm not forgetting anything.

stabilizer just makes the gas run a little bit rough. just make sure when you start it up in the spring, warm it up, change the oil and filter right away, then go for a ride. burn out all that bad stabilized gas, and then refil and then grin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Kwota said:
yeah, just top it up and add some stabilizer. then go for at least a 5 minute ride to get the stabilizer through the whole system. then go home, lift up the tank, turn off the petcock, and run the bike until it dies. by running the carbs/FInjectors dry there's nothing in them to gum up.

pull your battery and keep charging it periodically to prevent having to buy a new one in the spring.

ideally all fluids should be changed on an annual basis. coolant starts to go bad and it won't cool as well when it gets old. brake fluid gets nasty too. the more oil changes you do, the better, as transmission and cylinder oil are shared on the R6. frequent oil changes mean that the gears that are slowly getting ground down in in the transmission, or the crank's movements aren't generating that congealed metal paste that gives you cylinder wear. all fluids are very simple to change, so do it if you want your motor to last.

i make a list of everything that i did to store the bike and tape it to the tank, so that when it comes time to start it up, i'm not forgetting anything.

stabilizer just makes the gas run a little bit rough. just make sure when you start it up in the spring, warm it up, change the oil and filter right away, then go for a ride. burn out all that bad stabilized gas, and then refil and then grin.
thats some great advice :thumbup
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top