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Discussion Starter #1
I havent really messed with my suspension since I got the bike back in May. Im 187lbs and do mostly city riding right now. I like to get low into the corners rather than fast and straight. Also, the bike was bought used and dont know if the previous owner tweaked it any. How would I get it back to stock to start over? Any helpful advice Id appreciate. Thanks.
 

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It should be in your owner's manual.

I don't remember it off the top of my head but I can post it when I get home. I'm 185lbs and I found a pretty good setting (which is also at home) which I can give you if you want. It's tweaked from the SportRider site but I think those guys were on crack when they set the suspension.
 

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I'm 187 too, and I've been keeping an eye out for another rider with similar weight to post up their suspension settings. Mine is at stock settings right now, and I can tell you that you definitely don't want to keep it there for too long, it's way too soft (in my opinion) for our weight.
 

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All fat bastards unite!:D

I'm about 200lbs with full gear.

I bought my bike used with 2k miles and it seemed that the suspension was stiffened up a lot. almost no sag and no compliance over bumps. I researched on the 'net and found some baseline settings from SportRider.com but with those settings, the front seems to stack and wash away with any kind of road irregularities. I upped the compression and lowered the rebound a bit and the front felt much better. There was also less dive under hard braking. The rear will now absorb most bumps and still feel well planted in the twisties and not squat much on hard acceleration. I haven't tweaked it much after I got to this point since it was getting cold and now my bike is in hibernation :(.

I have all the settings written down so I can adjust from there. These settings is more for spirited riding so you might have to soften it a bit but then again, you might really like it for riding around town.

I'll try to get it posted tonight sometime.
 

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not be mean because I too am a "fat" bastard but if you plan on doing any hard riding (tracks, canyons, etc) you will need to resping your bike for your weight.

at 195lbs you will nead about a .95 Kg/mm maybe a .90 Kg/mm fork springs up front.. stock is 0.85. In the rear you will need a 10.7 Kg/mm and stock is 9.85 Kg/mm.


I would check your sag and make sure you are within what you want and if not change springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wouldnt call myself fat. Muscular build with more lean muscle mass and less body fat. I do like to hit the corners hard when Im riding and the bike does feel a little hard in the rear. The nose does dive under moderate to heavy braking.
 

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I wasnt implieing that you were fat.. hell my playing weight was 185 - 200 in highschool and college baseball. I am over that now.. infact i need a 1.0 Kg/mm up front. I am just saying that if you weigh over like 160 lbs the stock springs may not work... remeber this bike was built by tiny Japense people .. :)

If the bike is diving too much under braking or the rear end is bottoming out it doenst matter what you do w/ your compression and rebound because the bike will handle like shit. I know that when I got my bike resprung it was like night and day in the way that it handled.
 

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I was just messin' around about the weight thing :p

I think the spring rates are good for my weight. I thought I'd have to change them before I started adjusting the settings. Sag is set at 25mm (1 in) front and rear for me and it handles MUCH better than before. There's less dive under hard braking and more balanced in the twisties.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I know the whole weight thing is a joke. Just felt like being a smarta$$. But not trying to be a dick tho. :myfault
 

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You really should spend the money and have a suspension expert help you get a baseline for the bike. Well worth the money and has taken seconds off my lap times. Well worth the money.

Drop the folks at Advanced Motorsports a dime as they're a certified Öhlins service center. Yeah, all they sell is Ducati but I bet they'll help set up any bike that comes their way.
 

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As much as I like riding and tweaking stuff on my bike, I'm not a pro rider and I'm not paying someone to make one click on my bike. But that's just me.

Here are my settings:

Front preload - 6 lines
Front rebound damping - 7 clicks out from full stiff
Front compression damping - 7 clicks out

Rear preload - 5th from full soft
Rear rebound damping - 7 clicks out
Rear compression damping - 7 clicks out

SportRider's settings:
Front preload - 6 lines
Front rebound damping - 2 clicks out from full stiff
Front compression damping - 6 clicks out

Rear preload - 5th from full soft
Rear rebound damping - 10 clicks out
Rear compression damping - 10 clicks out

I rode SportRider settings for a day and decided it wasn't good for a rider my size so I rode with some tools for a few days to dial in the settings I have now. I wasn't done but it's a good starting point for most guys my weight that ride spiritedly. I'll probably make a few more adjustments next spring.
 

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I'm not a pro rider myself, but it was worth every penny. :D

At the very least, get someone that knows what's going on to help you set your sag and go from there.

On a side note, Vin Diesel, Grand Vizier of Persia in the tenth century, carried his library with him wherever he went. The 117,000 volumes were carried by 400 camels which were trained to walk in alphabetical order.
 

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Yeah, definitely get someone that knows what they're doing if you don't. I kinda knew what I was doing and I read up a ton before I started making changes so I felt comfortable making the changes and tweaking it for my weight and riding style. I used SportRider's settings as a baseline starting point but they're not good for street riding, maybe for the track.

I made a spreadsheet and wrote in all the changes as I went along with some comments about each setting so I could go back if the changes I made were worse.
 
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