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Discussion Starter #1
I know I had seen this on the old site but I was wondering if every one could put thier two cents in as to what every one should bring on a track day. It's all the little things that I tend to forget, so I'm looking to have a check list more or less.

Thanks for all the input as to my "saftey wiring ?'s" post.
 

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The essentials that we bring are:

Gear
helmet
gloves
earplugs
leathers
back protector
boots
sox
underarmour



tools

sockets
allens
ratchet
front and rear stands
combo wrenches
tape (elect., duct, galfer)
zipties
sidecutter/dykes
extra bolts, screws, washers
extra parts(clipons, pegs, levers, etc)
ramp

misc
faceshield cleaner
extra clothes
BIKE KEY
gas can
ez-up/canopy
chairs
water/gatorade
advil
cash
camera
extra tie downs
feminine hygene products(for the women)
sunscreen
 

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I think the most important thing to remember is probably the bike key. :) I made it a point to remind myself to bring the key when I went to Pocono Thursday because I had forgetten to bring the key just going for a ride before (locked all the door of the house, walked to the bike all suit up just to find out I didn't have the key with me).
 

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Another list that might be helpful would be this: What needs to be done to a stock bike for it to be allowed on the track?
 

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as to the stock bike question.. depending on the group that hosts the event.. it can range... but if it's just a trackday.. most of them just require that you tape off the headlights, tail lights (i'd also unplug em.. melted duct tape = :().. and take off your mirrors.. some will also suggest that you tape off your speedo..

refering to the bike key thing.. i haven't made the mistake of leaving the key at home... but i have had a friend take a spill infront of me.. and his key was ejected from him bike.. Not alot of damage to the bike or him.. But we couldn't find his key (musta flown far :D) and he was done for the weekend... I suggest that you saftey wire the key to the bike.. Just in case
 

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adding to the stock bike setup:

some organizations want "water wetter" in your radiator instead of regular coolant. and safety wiring at least your oil filter (hose clap around the filter safety wired to the frame).
 

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Some things to add:

oil
oil catch pan
oil filter
grease
rags
more zip-ties :D
air gauge
air tank or mini air compressor

Of course a lot of this is mostly "optional", but it should ensure you have a complete day if something minor was to go wrong.

As for the key, I always take my extra key with me. One stays on the key ring with my car keys, the other stays in a pocket on my gear bag. :D
 

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i think pretty much everyhing has been covered above.


other things you might need for your CAR/TRUCK/TRAILER!!!!!!!.......

spare trailer tires,
car/truck tire removal tools,
a JACK.......



i say this because my 2nd trackday this year, i had a trialer tire blow out just before the track, adn didnt have a spare :umm and i would have been screwed without a jack...... which i dont usually have on me (car audio is more important :wink )
 

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Having done 60+ track days and 40+ race weekends over the past 3 years, i would say drive to the hotel near the track the NIGHT BEFORE, and try to ride with someone or have someone that lives in your area have 2 people that went to the track. If you live 10min away this obviously is a mute point but driving for hours the morning of the track day SUCKS ASS. I have done it occasionaly. Even if one of my buddies drove it sucks. You pack up. Try to get a little sleep, but you cant cause your wound up.. THen drive up at 3am.. (JenningsGP is a 3 hour drive for us here in Tampa).. By mid day you feel like shit. Split a cheap hotel with someone or even get a good air mattress and split it 3 ways..
You DO have a slim possiblity of getting your bell rung and it is a good idea to have someone who could drive home for you.
 

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A med kit isn't a bad idea. We have a pretty fleshed out kit that we bring with when we go. If you bring it, you probably won't need it!

(...and let me emphasize the bike key again... I've forgotten mine; it really sucks to watch all your friends riding around while you just sit there. :( )
 

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Camera

Did anyone mention camera? The ride is temporary but the pics are forever. Also pen and paper to record how the bike handled on the settings you use that session. Lap timer-because we all love #'s. First time track visitor- because we love to remember what it felt like the first time we went to the track. Spare tires, gauges, clothes, shoes, gloves, etc. because we are an anal bunch.
 

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AirKnight said:
I think the most important thing to remember is probably the bike key. :) I made it a point to remind myself to bring the key when I went to Pocono Thursday because I had forgetten to bring the key just going for a ride before (locked all the door of the house, walked to the bike all suit up just to find out I didn't have the key with me).
If you never want to forget your key again why don't you either safety wire it to your triple or you could bridge the ignition switch so it is controlled by the red flip switch on the right clip on. My friends on the race team up here do not have an ignition switch. They just flip the red flip switch (brain cramp, I can't think of the real name) and then press the starter button. Be sure if you do that that you drill a small hole through the red flip switch so it can not be turned on during transport. It will run your battery down. They put a "Remove before flight" ribbon on it that has a metal clip through it.
 

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kevo said:
The essentials that we bring are:
feminine hygene products (for the women)
:myfault So does this really work? I mean... Do you use them on yourself or do you spread them around and then grab the wimmins when the reach down to pick them up. :bugeyes Are you using the spray or solid?

I wonder if it would work off track? I've been trying to figure out a way to attract more wimmins but I hadn't considered feminine hygene products as bait... :doublekis
I may just give it a try. It sounds cheaper than dinner, movie, conversation... :p
 

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General Track Day Info

A local site I go to was putting together some trackday prep items and reasons that people use to not do trackdays. I thought it was a good thread so I wanted to pass on the info they came up with.

Do any of the Mods want to make this a sticky?

Trackday Bike Prep Helpful Tips:
1: Use Painters Tape (Baby Blue 3M Stuff) since it's the least sticky tape you can use to tape over your heradlight & tailight. Makes getting it off much easier. I usually use electrical tape for a nice clean look and don't have any problems with the adhesive.
2. Pull your Headlight & Tailight Fuse/ Unplug the connector--This keeps the headlight from heating the tape adheisive and aids in removal. The tailight fuse is more of a courtesy to other riders since you may miss a little bit of of the tail light and the riders behind you will constantly be distracted by some little sliver of a brake light every time you use the brakes.
3. Remove your mirrors and signals instead of taping them--In the event of even the mildest fall over they'll break--Why incur damage that can be totally avoided?
4. If you remove your mirrors use a zip tie or mirror block off plates to keep the fairing secured to the fairing stay.
5. Check your tire pressure the day before and the morning of the event. Heat changes the air pressure and you want to make sure your tires are not overinflated or underinflated.
6. Check your tires for uneven wear--Especially the rear--The rear wheel may be misalighned which will negatively effect your bikes handling.
7. Check your chain tension--A overtightend chain eliminates you rear suspensions ability to move up & down freely which hurts your ability to turn and absorb bumps & other track irregularities. It's also harder to be smoth with a tight jerky chain. A loose chain is also a hazzard since too much slack means the chain is not securly rotating around the sprockets.
8. Lube your chain--Metal on metal contact causes accelerated wear on your chain.
9. Check all your hand & foot controls for securing screws, nuts, allen bolts, etc... You don't want to figure out that that left footpegs is loose when your downshifting for a corner. If you plan on doing more than just the occasional track day you should think about safety wiring.
10. Check to make sure you bodyworks properly secured--Fairings that flap & flex will likely break at the area with the most stressplaced on it--Usaually a mounting point.

Reasons why I shouldn't attend a track day:
1. It's not safe on a racetrack. Probably the safest place to ride--Smoother surface than most roads and free of gravel, salt, mud, paint stripes, tar snakes. An Ambulance with trained EMT's to treat you if anything happens.
2. I've seen motorcycles on a racetrack and I'm no racer. Trackdays are not about being first--It's not a race, it's an event to learn & improve your skills as a rider in a safe environment. The pace & how fast you ride is up to you & no one else--No pressure to keep up like a street ride since you won't be left out in the middle of nowhere.
3. I'm a newer rider & I'm not a good enough rider to ride on a track. The best learners are the ones who haven't developed any bad habits yet. A novice rider who listen to qualifed instructors will quickly be able to learn & apply the proper techniques without having to unlearn their old habits. But even old dogs who've been riding for a long time can improve their skills and learn some new tricks that'll make them faster & smoother riders.
4. I don't plan on getting my racing license so why bother spending time of the track. Skills that you develop on the racetrack can directly benefit your ability to safely ride on the street. If you've never leaned your bike over, how will you know how hard you can turn if you need to make an evasive manuaver? Tracking riding is about being smooth, not just faster. Smooth riding keeps your suspension settled and allows your tires to grip properly which we all can agree is a good thing while you leaned over in a turn.
5. Going thru the same corners will be boring after a couple times. Just the opposite--You'll know what to expect which will allow you to concentrate fully on the particular turn & improve your skills.
6. I've heard people ride crazy on the track and are unsafe. Depending on the group that you ride in (Novice/Intermediate/Race) determines the passing rules & overall on track ettiquette. The Novice group maintians a strict rule that all passes must be made with at least 6 feet of seperation and it is the responsbility of the passing rider to ensure that the pass is safe and does not put the rider being passed in any danger. There are always Instructors & Control Riders circulating the track in every group and unsafe riding, passing, and negative behavior will not be tolerated.
7. I don't have the proper attire like a leather/textile suit, back protector, full gauntlet leather gloves, or boots.-->These are itmes you should be riding with anyway, so buy them regardless of whether or not you do a trackday. However, these items can often be rented by from the trackday organizer and/or borrowed from from a fellow rider.
8. $135, thats too expesive for me.-->Going a measly 92MPH on the street can set you back a good amount and possibly get your license suspended for a few months. A trackday is actually relatively inexpensive.


A good checklist:

Prepare yourself
1) Know the rules and regulation
2) Sign up in advance to assure you spot.
3) Proof of membership
4) Photo ID
5) Bring confirmation of registration or any invoices.
6) Medical emergency info/form in your leathers.

Prepare the Bike
1) Clean bike is a happy bike
2) Tape over or remove the required lenses
3) Remove mirrors
If needed...
4) Apply “competition” numbers
5) Safety wire as required (oil filter, drain plug, fill plug)
6) Drain antifreeze and replace with distilled water and Water Wetter.

Check over the bike. Remember when in doubt repair/replace it
1) Brakes are not below half wear
2) Tires in good condition approx ½ tread left. Set pressures
3) Chain adjustment and sprockets
4) Bodywork is secure
5) Grips are not loose
6) Throttle returns freely
7) Levers function smoothly and are not broken. Brake lever does contact bar.
8) All cables, lines and wires are secure and snag free
9) No loose fasters or brackets including exhaust system, wheels, suspension, and brakes
10) No engine, coolant, suspension, or brake component leaks.

Safety First
1) Helmet Snell, Dot, or European Standard fixed full face
2) Leathers
3) Boots
4) Gloves
5) Back protector
6) Rain gear???

At the track
1) Canopy
2) Chair
3) Tools
4) Spare parts, levers, bars, master links, etc
5) Food and Drink
6) Gas
7) Service manual just incase.
8) Spare keys for any thing that uses keys. Your car, bike, bike lock, trailer.
 

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very good write-up bluebur :handclap



.
 

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NoBull said:
Seems to me the reasons not to go are all the reasons you SHOULD go, but maybe the NOT was tongue-in-cheek.
That part of the write up has something a person would would say/think that would make them not want to go, and then the reason why they SHOULD be going.
 

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Heres my list. I took all of yours and I added a couple I thought of.

Gear
Helmet(s)
Gloves
Earplugs
Leathers
Back protector
Boots
Socks
Underarmour




Tools
Ratchet and sockets
Allen wrenches
Front and rear stands
Combo wrenches
Tape (elect., duct, galfer)
Tie wraps
Sidecutter/dykes
Extra bolts, screws, washers
Extra parts(clipons, pegs, levers, etc)
Ramp
Oil
Oil filter
Oil catch pan
Grease
Rags
Air gauge
Air compressor
Generator



Misc.
Faceshield cleaner
Extra clothes
BIKE KEY
Gas can
Ez-up/canopy
Chairs
Water/gatorade
Snacks
Advil
Cash
Camera
Extra tie downs
Sunscreen (hat)
First aid kit
Bike maintenance/suspension sheet and pen
Tent (for staying at the track)
Alarm clock
 

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Proper Villain said:
you could bridge the ignition switch so it is controlled by the red flip switch on the right clip on. My friends on the race team up here do not have an ignition switch. They just flip the red flip switch (brain cramp, I can't think of the real name) and then press the starter button. Be sure if you do that that you drill a small hole through the red flip switch so it can not be turned on during transport.
I would like to see a How To on this one. . .I would do it on my street machine and leave the ignition switch there as a dummy. Most people would not think of that. That or mount a switch in some remote location to turn the bike on and off without the key.
 
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