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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm new to this community and I think I need your help. I used the search engine but I coundn't find something related to my question.

I bought a 00 R6 2 months ago.

The pre-owner had just water wetter and water in the cooling system. But I didn't know about that. A few weeks ago it got cold here in Denver, Colorado but the bike was outside anyway. Yesterday I started the bike to drive to the college but after 1 mile the temperature was over 200° F. It was maybe 25°F outside. I turned around and rode the bike home. I saw that the coolant level was below low and then I recognized a few small puddles on the ground.
Today I changed the water with anti-freeze. There were about 1.7 L in the radiator instead of 2.15 L. So I lost fluid because last week the coolant level indicator showed around 50% and yesterday it was below low.
After changing the coolant I went on a short ride but the temperature went above 240°F though I just filled it up correctly. The indicator showed no lose of coolant after the short ride. So what could be broken? The water pump?

Thank you very much
 

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Way to use the search.
Here is some info on water wetter.
http://www.redlineoil.com/whitePaper/17.pdf

I'm assuming you used antifreeze and didnt fill it with water. Water wetter can't handle freezing temps so you probably have some cooling issues. Hard to say for sure. Puddles on the ground aren't a good sign though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used 50/50 water/antifreeze.

600f3rider said:
Water wetter can't handle freezing temps so you probably have some cooling issues.
That's what I thought, too. Strange is: I didn't lose coolant after I filled it up (so it was full) but the temperature raised above 240°F anyway
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No, no overflow. Something with the water transportation must be wrong because the radiator itself is pretty cool. Obviously only the water where the sensor is located got hot. So I think the water didn't flow.
 

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There are a few things that would keep the coolant from circulating thru the engine. The water pump as you mentioned, and the thermostat would be the first things I'd check.

You might want to check your oil also, if it has water in it then you need to start thinking about the head gasket or a cracked block / head. The water pump has a seal in it which could have been damaged and might let water leak into the engine too, even though there's a weep hole in the pump body that's supposed to keep that from happening.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
How can I check those things (thermostat and waterpump)? Does the pump automaticly generate pressure as soon as the engine is running?
How can I see if there's water in the oil?

Thanks for your reply so far!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh I have another idea. When I started the engine that morning when the heat problems occured the first time, I heard a bang from the right side of the bike. Could it be possible that the water in the waterpump was frozen and the connection or the waterpump itself broke when the engine startet to run?
How can I see if the waterpump is working?
 

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If there's alot of water in the oil, it'll look like chocolate milk. You'll see it on the dip stick. If you want to be sure, drain it.

The water pump starts spinning as soon as you start the engine. The coolant starts to move thru the engine as soon as it's up to temp. and the thermostat opens. If the bike is warm, with the cap off of the radiator you should see the coolant moving thru the rad. when you blip the throttle. The hoses into and out of the rad. should be warm also.

The water pump is only held onto the engine with 2 bolts, so if you want to remove it to inspect, it's not a very big job. Same with the thermostat, but it's a little more trouble to get to.

Frozen water expands and breaks things. It will be evident when you find the damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Can I spin the pumpwheel with my fingers if I remove it?

YamRZ350 said:
The coolant starts to move thru the engine as soon as it's up to temp.
What exactly is "up to temp"?

The hoses were not warm when the water got so hot during my test ride after the coolant exchange.
 

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Jaxx said:
Oh I have another idea. When I started the engine that morning when the heat problems occured the first time, I heard a bang from the right side of the bike. Could it be possible that the water in the waterpump was frozen and the connection or the waterpump itself broke when the engine startet to run?
How can I see if the waterpump is working?

Now you tell me! Yes that is very possible. Hopefully only the impeller sheared off it's shaft. The chain that drives the water pump also drives the oil pump, so if it broke, you would have heard some really nasty noises when you were riding.

Pull the hoses off of the water pump, remove the 2 allen head bolts and pull the pump out of the engine case. On the bench, pull the cover off and see what broke.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
oh yeah I think I've found the problem. The connection from the engine to the waterpump broke. But there are small pieces missing. I think the fell down into the engine. What can I do? What does a new pump or at least the connection cost?


This part is broken. The small pieces are down in the oil reservoir now?
 

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What broke, the shaft coming out of the pump, or what it slips into in the engine?

You need to pull the oil pan off and clean any pieces out of the sump.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
have you seen the picture i posted?

The part of the pump broke, not the one of the engine.

How can I remove the oil pan?
 

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Jaxx said:
have you seen the picture i posted?

The part of the pump broke, not the one of the engine.

How can I remove the oil pan?

You edited that picture in after I posted, I see it now. Yeah, hopefully the broken pieces are laying down in the bottom of the pan, and aren't small enough to get pulled thru the inlet screen on the oil pump. It's a shame you tried riding it after you heard the crunching sounds from the motor.

You need to drain the oil, pull the exhaust and remove all the bolts holding the pan on. Don't forget about the one in the middle next to the oil level sensor. You'll want to get a new pan gasket along with the impeller and seal.

I'm kind of surprised the oil pump isn't damaged too. You might want to inspect it real good when the pan is off.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
It was just a short bang and I was wondering what it was. The engine made no further noises and everything seemed to be ok until I recognized the temperature problems.
I found the part online in a local part store for 19 bucks.

Ok I'll take of the pan.

YamRZ350 said:
You'll want to get a new pan gasket along with the impeller and seal.
are you talking about the impeller of the pump? and which seal is that?
 

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Yes, that's what I meant. The broken shaft in the picture is the impeller shaft. When you pull it out of the pump housing to replace it, you're supposed to replace the water seal, oil seal and bearing at the same time.

You might get away without replacing them, but it's not that much more money to do it right.

Again, take a long hard look at the oil pump once you get the pan off.
 

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If I was doing the job, I'd replace 2,3,4,5,7,10 and 12. Plus the pan gasket, and maybe the (4) exhaust gaskets up at the head, assuming I didn't find anything else wrong once it was all apart.
 
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