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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HOWTO: lubricate clutch cable
This is a 2 beer project if you do it my way. Estimated time to complete is 30 minutes tops. This applies to the 05 but should be just about the same on all previous models....

What you will need:
- 4mm allen wrench
- Phillips screwdriver
- cable life lube (we won't use the tool)(http://www.protectall.com/cable_life.htm)
OR
any chain lube that also mentions cables on the bottle should work
OR
any 10w-30 motor oil (more difficult) (might help to have a syringe with this)
-eye protection

DO NOT USE WD40... wd40 doesn't last very long and when it starts to wear down it will leave your cable unprotected... people also say it attracts dirt to it which tends to be true with most lubricants... if you want to use WD40 to spray down into the cable first to clean it its a great solvent but I wouldn't use it as the final lubricant...

There are 2 ways to do this.... one is the halfass way and the other is the REALLY halfass way... I spent 3 hours today playing around with this and trying to find a shortcut and was unable to... so my best suggestion is to just follow the halfass way and be happy... I tried to use the cable life tool and it is unable to clamp onto the throttle tube at all (too small a diameter) so trying to do this the more complete way is a pretty big waste of time... To do this we will be interested in 2 areas of the bike... the area by the throttle and the area on the left side of the bike where the throttle cables attach... (if you want to do this the really halfass way you will just be worried about the throttle area)...

Use eye protection any time you work with aerosol lubricants or any chance you have of getting some in your eye. I promise if you spray hard enough into these tubes as illustrated below some will kick back at you... you don't want it in your eyes...

Step 1: on the bottom side of the big housing (that houses your big red ignition kill switch) you will see 2 phillips screws... one is toward the front the other towards the back... remove both of them... here are the best pictures I could take of the screws:
Looking from the rear of the bike up to the front:

Looking from the front of the bike to the rear:


Step 2: If you want to do this the REALLY halfass way skip down to step 8. On the left side of your bike you want to remove the piece of mid fairing. This is done by removing the 2 screws shown with small arrows and then slide the piece showing with a big arrow forwards and remove it: (it is also detailed in your owners manual so if you haven't done this before you may use that in addition to this for assistance)


Step 3: Remove the 3 screws shown here:


Step 4: If you look down through that hole created by the piece we removed in step 2 you will notice this one more screw and this ratcheting tie.... remove both of them:


Step 5: rotate the fairing piece out of the way as shown here to expose the lower end of the throttle cables.


Step 6: Place a few paper towels where shown to catch any excess lube that drips out the far end of the throttle tubes.


Step 7: Spray some lubricant along the ends of the cables that are exposed and on the track that the cables feed through on the gold colored wheel and wipe up any excess.

Step 8: Pull the top half (the part that has the red kill switch on it) off of the bottom and rotate it out of the way. Like this:


Step 9: Spray lubricant into the 2 throttle tubes (shown with arrows in step 8, where the throttle cable enters the tubes... turn the throttle grip by hand back and forth to help work the lube along the cable...

Step 10: Clean up any excess mess and reassemble in the reverse order of which was disassembled.

The consequences of not taking off the mid fairing to do this (the REALLY halfass way) is that all the excess lube that goes through the throttle tube will drip and land all over the engine making a big mess and the part of the cable and moving parts of the outer throttle assembly (including where the cable travels over the gold wheel) will not be lubricated)...

After doing this the throttle seems about 10% easier and snappier on my 05 with 2400 miles on it... on older bikes or higher mileage bikes the benefit would probably be more apparent in addition to the benefit as preventive maintenance... (no one wants a snapped throttle cable)...

The alternative to the cable spray of regular motor oil could be done in the same way as the above steps but instead of spraying into the tubes, to use a syringe to put the oil into the cable tubes.

This is called the half ass way because to properly do it involves removing the throttle cables from the throttle grip assembly and forcing lubricant through the tube such as with the "cable life" tool... however since this tool doesn't seem to fit onto our throttle cables at all... and since it is VERY hard to remove the throttle cables... I see no real benefit in doing so... To do this "properly" would probably take an hour and a half and be a 4 beer job... I don't think that is worth it for the increased benefit? (possibly 10% better lubrication of the throttle cables if that)

I take no responsibility for these instructions, for excessive beer consumption, or for anything else you do to mess your sh*t up... this is just how I did it and use at your own risk!

As corrected added screwdriver to the list and corrected bolts to screws. Thanks Mr. Smurf for the corrections

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Discussion Starter #3
lol ya i'd say so.... if you were really feening for doing something in the off season you could always spend the 3+ hours to detach all the cables and lube them the "right" way... but I don't think I ever get that bored ;)
 

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To the Track Stat!!!
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Good write up.
 

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I literally just finished doing this about 2min ago following the directions listed here. 2.5 quick things to add:

1. When removing the two screws under the kill switch housing they are phillips screws.
1.5 Add a phillips screw driver to your list of needed tools.

2. I have a frame slider in the way of removing the plastic housing in step 5. You can still get to the throttle wheel if you bend the piece ever so slightly and get in there with the red straw provided with the cable lube.

That is all, all in all this was really a one beer job and even if you have a hard time changing your oil, you can do this in less than an hour. Also make sure you have plenty of paper towels around as the spray seemed to get everywhere, and the eye protection is 110% NEEDED.

Thanks for the great write up! Been meaning to do this for a while. Also my bike is '03.
 

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Shes back!!
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Good stuff
 

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I just did this, i found it very difficult to get oil with a syringe, down the throttle cable tubes, they seem even narrower than the clutch cables... but after lots of working the throttle it is definetly snappier. :thumbup
 

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Just finished doing this for the first time. The CableLife tool is great and does it's job. But even with it's so-called "improved design", it's still very messy. Just make sure you have a rag wrapped tight on both openings on the CableLife tool.
 

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i'd just like to add that the Cable Life tool works just fine for the clutch and throttle cables. I just finished the entire procedure the hard way and it took an hour, maybe 1.5 hours to pull off and really wasn't a 4-beer job. Maybe 2.5. The only real pain in the ass is putting the cable back into position, which takes a bit of shimmying, some pliers, and a decent amount of persistence (especially the throttle cables).

But the cable life tool doesnt completely seal the cable (i put it over the metal cable and the housing) if you use a set of pliers to screw it down tighter than just thumb screwing it you get minimal drip out of the tool itself and about 3-4 seconds of spraying will put lubricant all the way through length of the cable (as evidenced by lube dripping out the other end).

Some last minute suggestions for those doing the hard way:

Clutch:
-unscrew the bolt holding the clutch lever to the handgrips and completely unscrew the metal... collar(?) that adjusts the cable slack once all this pops out, the cable will fall right out.

-to get it back in, screw the collar in about halfway without putting the cable into lever. once it's screwed in, you should be able to pull it with some pliers and slip it back into the lever easily. then just bolt down the lever.

Throttle Cable Tips:
-unscrew the allen bolt between the two cables

-twist the throttle completely open and remove the "near" cable first.

-the throttle return cable should just pop out easily from there.

-remove the cables from the assembly

-When putting cables back in, reattach the throttle return cable first (make sure the metal separator between the two cable housings is back in place beforehand.

-pull the cable our of the housing as much as possible first before putting it back in the control housing

-twist the throttle all the way open and slip the other cable back in. (this is the hardest cable to reattach)

Good luck! Oh, and when i say "using pliers" i'd only grip the metal ball end, NOT the cable itself. using pliers on the cable may end up slipping and fraying the metal, which is exactly what you are trying to avoid by lubing and maintaining the cable.
 
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