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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is the long awaited "How To" for the Crank Case Breather Modification. This modification vents the Crank Case into the AIS. This will only work if you still have the AIS, if you removed it this modification cant be done. I have rode with this modification since I got my 2004 R6, it was done by a race mechanic for me. I just removed it because I needed to do a complete AIS removal because of deceleration popping with my new full Hindle exhaust system. I have had no problems with this modification, it has been done to many bikes by my race mechanic and many other mechanics without any issues. This modification has shown 1-2 hp increase on the dyno, no BS! If you want to know more about this modification, read these comments.

You will need:
2 - 1/2 inch caps sold at your local auto parts store
2 - hose clamp to secure the cap
Approximately 14 inches of 1/2 inch tubing
1 - tubing connector for 1/2 inch tubing above (may use a piece of pipe)

1. Remove or prop up gas tank


2. Remove the gray AIS hose on the left


3. Place a cap with hose clamp on the outlet


4. Remove the gray hose from both the crank case and the airbox
(mines black)


5. Place a cap and hose clamp on the airbox where you removed
the gray hose from #4 (the pic shows the cap, but no clamp)


6. Connect the piece of (14 inch ) tubing to the crank case, retain
hose clamp from removed hose (I used clear for illustration purposes)


7. Route the tubing from the crank case along the side of the frame
to the gray AIS hose you removed in #2. Cut 1 -2 inches off the gray
AIS hose to remove the molded bend. Install your tubing connector
in the gray AIS hose. Cut the excess tubing you ran from the crank
case and connect the two tubes. (mines gray and clear) (air box
removal isn't necessary, had it off to do something else)


8. Make sure everything is connected and clears when the tank is
down. Bolt down the gas tank and your done! :woot Treat yourself to a :beermug or :beermug :beermug :beermug :thumbup


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VegasR6 said:
I'm thinking because you gain HP hooking it up to the AIS.
That is pretty obvious, I was looking for a specific reason. :kickinnut

I asked about it in class today and there are HP gains by lowering the pressure in the crankcase because you reduce pumping losses. So by running the PCV into the exhaust (where there is lower pressure compared to the intake manifold) you create lower pressure in the crankcase and therefore gain HP. :2cents
 

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No, its just to keep the hot, oily air out of the clean, cool intake air. Really doesnt do much for hp.

The AIS system wont give you enough negative pressure on the crankcase to be noticed in the overall system.
 

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So is it basically a preference here? Would I make any gains or get any benefits out of doing this mod? I know he said that 1 to 2 hp gains on the dyno no BS. Can someone confirm this with a dyno sheet of before and after? Not saying I don't believe someone but I would like to see it on paper is someones got it.
 

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It will give you a little better throttle response, and make it easier to tune. If you havent done anything to your engine, you *might* see a 1-2hp gain, but that small a gain is subjective.

Take a bike to a dyno on wed, then on thurs, and you might see a 1-2hp difference...
 

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O.K. thanks sounds like a solid answer to me. Not going to bother with this one. Good write up though :thumbup
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Everyone has their own opinion, especially when it comes to motors and modifications. This modification will give you better throttle response and the crank case will breathe better due to lower pressure. This creates more of a closed system for the crank case, reducing pressure in the crank case and creating a slight hp gain.

I believe this is a beneficial modification, but don't do it just for the slight hp gain, the slight hp gain is just an added bonus. The modification is easy and can be done for around $5. It doesn't take much time and can be done when you are installing v-stack, side stops or just checking/ replacing the air filter.

This modification is commonly done on race car engines. So when this is done on a 575 hp engine you are going to see a higher hp gain then when doing it on a 123 hp R6. Any way you look at it 1-2 hp isn't bad, especailly if you have a PC3, v-stacks, and side stops. Every little bit adds up in the end if your trying to squeeze everything out of the R6 without tearing into the engine.
 

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^^ I agree... I have it done on both my race bikes, except my hose is routed to a catch can, per race regulations.

I did not mean to imply that this is a worthless mod... sorry if it came across that way.

Another benefit is, you will have less oil in your intake path, which means less build up on your valves, pistons, and cylinder walls. It will also help the engines resistance to pinging, allowing you to run a lower octane, which = more power. :wink
 

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I took my 6 to get a custom PC3 map made and was told by a few performance shops that the AIS really should be blocked off during the dyno/tune process. I was told that by blocking it off for tuning keeps the dynoameter from reading a rich condition at between 3 and 4500k in the a/f coming thru the exhaust. With the AIS not modified for tuning it shoves a little extra into the A/F and makes the tuner lean it out because of the false reading when really at thoes RPM's you want it richer!

Anyways I called another shop on the westcoast and was told pretty much the same thing. Of course my POS shop that did my tuning didnt block it off and i honeslty didnt want them touching my bike anymore than they had to getting it mapped.

just a thought.
 

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hey so thrak, you run it to a catch can then back to the airbox like the SS Kit manual says or do you block off the airbox and run it to a catch can? Also is that catch can mainly for a blown engine or what? I mean can I make a smaller catch can or what?
 

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I do not run it back to the airbox.. no reason to.

Yes, the catch can is :

1) to catch oil out of the crank case (there's more than you'd think)
2) if you motor blows to catch as much as possible and not put it on the road/track, or your back tire.

I also drill/punch holes in the top of the catch can for a vent, to prevent any type of pressure build up.
 

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I dont see a how to on his site, but you do NOT want to cap the crank case breather. (the outlet from the engine)

If anything you want a negative vacuum, not positive pressure, which is what a cap would do.
 

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I might do this to my R6 this week-end. Out of curiousity, I've noticed my bike is smells like it's running rich after my slip-on install. I've tried leaning it out some with my PC3 and a map, but it still stinks. This may sound like a dumb question, but can this mod help "clear-up" my exhaust odor/smell?
 

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This is an old school hot rodder trick. In a forced induction scenario, the crankcase pressures get really high, so most people just use an air filter mounted onto a catch can like mentioned earlier.

Here is what a N/A setup would look like... basically welding a bung onto the exhaust so it can suck the fumes out of the crankcase..

http://store.summitracing.com/defau...ults=false&N=115&target=egnsearch.asp&x=0&y=0
 
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