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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bike 2004 R6

I changed out the stock setup for the 520 conversion D.I.D./Renthal 15/49. Here are pics and some details.


1.) Remove left lower fairing. I do it without taking off the mid fairing because I'm lazy like that. Then remove two bolts that hold on the coolant overflow and cable tie it out of the way.


2.) Remove front sprocket cover and work it out and off bike. I did this without removing the shift rod. While you are in this area you need to straighten the large counter shaft lock washer so it's flat. I do this with a flat head screw driver. Leave the nut tight for now.


3.) Next I wrapped a thick towel around a metal rod (mine is from a floor jack) and put it between the wheel and swingarm to hold the wheel in place as I loosened the sprocket nut (32mm). You can also try holding the rear brake if you want. That method does not work well at all. Once you loosen the nut just leave it on the bike for now so you can cut the chain..


4.) Now it's safe to cut the chain off. I used a dremel and cut off the end of the rivet heads and then popped off the sideplate with a flat head screw driver. Once the link is removed with the bike in nuetral roll the chain off the front sprocket.



5.) Next remove rear wheel and remove rear sprocket (17mm nuts).



6.) Install new sprocket to wheel tightening with cross pattern. Torque 72ft-lbs USE CAUTION! some have stripped the nuts (read this thread)


7.) Install rear wheel and now is a good time to take off the front sprocket all ready loose and put on new sprocket hand tight with new lock washer. Now you need to figure out how many links you need for your setup. With the 15/49 I am same as stock length so I had to cut 4 links off a 120 link chain. Double check before you cut to many off! Then run new chain up and around front sprocket and connect it on the rear sprocket.


8.) Now with a rivet tool press the side plate onto the chain. Then rivet together. I have seen rivet specs on how big you should press the head( I don't have the specs). You want to press it enough, but don't want to crack or split the rivet. The rivet tool is a must have and lasts forever so it's worth the money.


9.) You can now adjust the chain slack and wheel alignment. Next torque up the rear wheel axle nut(80ft-lbs). Then tighten and torque front sprocket nut (65ft-lbs) with wheel wedged reversed from removal. Crimp lock washer with channel locks in two locations.


10.) Install cover, coolant overflow and fairing and your done.


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Discussion Starter #4
blueblur said:
Looks good. I just ordered my chain and sprockets a few nights ago so you did this just in time :smilecool

You will like it. Can't beat the gains you get for under $200.
 

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How many links will I have to cut off of the new chain? I got the 520 chain, same brand as yours. But I have a 15/48 steup.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You will be safe with 116 links (stock length). Your wheel will sit a little further back on swingarm. If that bothers you do a test fit and see if 115 links will work. Don't cut off to many links! If you stick with 116 links then you leave room to go up teeth in the rear if you want.
 

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Is it still righty tighty lefty loosey for the nut on the front sprocket? The reason I ask, is because the front sprocket rotates counter clockwise, and maybe Yamaha would make it reverse. I'm trying to loosen it with my wife on the bike stepping on the rear brake with a steel rod going through the rear wheel and swingarm, and that shit still won't loosen. I'm using a 1/2" breaker bar with a 32mm socket. Maybe heating it up with a heat gun first would help? Tezzmin, how many washers did you put in the back of the sprocket? Mine came with two, but I've read where people got away with only using one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
sleeperR6 said:
Is it still righty tighty lefty loosey for the nut on the front sprocket? The reason I ask, is because the front sprocket rotates counter clockwise, and maybe Yamaha would make it reverse. I'm trying to loosen it with my wife on the bike stepping on the rear brake with a steel rod going through the rear wheel and swingarm, and that shit still won't loosen. I'm using a 1/2" breaker bar with a 32mm socket. Maybe heating it up with a heat gun first would help? Tezzmin, how many washers did you put in the back of the sprocket? Mine came with two, but I've read where people got away with only using one.

It's standard thread. So keep trying. I had that problem with my buddies. He sat on the bike 190lbs holding both brakes and I was trying to loosen the nut with so much effort the bike was sliding across his garage. So we had to rest the front wheel against the wall and it still took allot of rigged up leverage to bust it loose. It was stock and it was old so that might be why.

I assume you are asking about the front sprocket washers? I didn't use any behind it. Just the lock washer (stock). Renthal doesn't supply washers. There is a thick side to it and that faces out. I don't know what brand your sprockets are. You might want to call the manufacturer to find out.

Same goes for rear. I used the stock washers and they go on before the nut.
 

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Yeah, that front nut is a bitch to get off. When I was removing mine, the torque wrench clicked at 100lbs before it broke loose.

Good write-up, Tezz. I liked the pics too.

Justin
 

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Prodigal Son
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I have heard of people being careful with the lock washer on the front sprocket and reusing it. I am planing on buying a new one, but I wanted to confirm this in case I mess it up or something. Also, does anyone know the part number for said lock washer or could point it out on partsfish.com for me?


Second, do all the sprockets have one side that faces out and one that faces in? Is this clear?

Thanks,

JoJo
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
r6jojo said:
I have heard of people being careful with the lock washer on the front sprocket and reusing it. I am planing on buying a new one, but I wanted to confirm this in case I mess it up or something. Also, does anyone know the part number for said lock washer or could point it out on partsfish.com for me?


Second, do all the sprockets have one side that faces out and one that faces in? Is this clear?

Thanks,

JoJo
I have re used the lock washer a few times. I just crimped the opposite ends. I'm not saying it's safe but I had no troubles. I decided to buy a new washer to go with the new setup. They are dirt cheap and should be replaced. It is part #34 here.
http://216.37.204.203/Yamaha_OEM/YamahaMC.asp?Type=13&A=371&B=18
Some manufacturers the sprockets come with washers and some have different spacing on each side for the 520 conversion. So I can't tell you how to install the front on other brands. Might want to check with the brand you decide to go with. They do have a outside and inside due to the 520 sprockets is thinner than stock.
 

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Prodigal Son
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Thanks TEZZMIN, big help!


One more question that I should have asked in the previous post, but I forgot. I'm going up to 51 tooth in the rear, staying stock in front. Most of the chains seem to come in 120 link lengths only. Is this long enough? Any idea how many links I should go to?

Thanks again,

JoJo
 

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Discussion Starter #16
r6jojo said:
Thanks TEZZMIN, big help!


One more question that I should have asked in the previous post, but I forgot. I'm going up to 51 tooth in the rear, staying stock in front. Most of the chains seem to come in 120 link lengths only. Is this long enough? Any idea how many links I should go to?

Thanks again,

JoJo

120 links is plenty. Stock is 116 links. You will need to test fit the chain with new sprockets on the bike and cut off the links you don't need (if any). Be sure to double check and don't cut off to much. Since I am running 15/49 I can't tell you how many links you need.
 

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Prodigal Son
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Thanks, you've been very helpful as I try to buy all this stuff and get it to my parent's house in Florida in time for Christmas where I'll be staying and hopefully giving myself a little present. Final question (for now): Kneedraggers has a chain rivet tool and a "Jumbo Chain Tool". I know someone recommended the Jumbo tool a while back to me because I have it on a list of things to buy to change my sprockets. Which is recommended? Also, which ever one you recommend, could you tell me which of the options in the pull down menu I need to get to do this? The rivet tool has different size pins and the Jumbo Tool has some kind of Quad Rivet thingy. I appreciate all the help,

JoJo

Jumbo Tool
http://www.kneedraggers.com/details/56-MP-3

Chain Rivet Tool
http://www.kneedraggers.com/details/56-MP-1
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Honestly I don't know much about either tool you are considering. Looks like they both do the job. I bought mine directly from AFAM about 5 years ago. I don't know the brand but it looks allot like the two you have shown. Sorry I couldn't help. You could e-mail Todd at www.calsportbike.com and see what he reccomends. He has always gave me great prices and responds quickly.
 

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On the chain you will more than likely only use 118 of the 120 links(its always an even number).

Chain length can be pre-calculated by:
Taking the difference in the number of teeth being changed and dividing by 2.
It is suggested to always add one to the result.
(Round up or down to the nearest even link, if you have a remainder such as .5)

Example(Stock R6 gearing 16/48 going to 16/51):
16 + 48 = 64
16 + 51 = 67
67 - 64 = 3 divide by 2 = 1.5 = 2(Rounded to nearest even number)
Which gives you 116 Links + 2 = 118 Links

On the chain tool :
We typically suggest the Chain Riveting tool over the Jumbo tool, unless money is no object.
The exception to that is if you are doing a lot of side work for friends
Or you are racing every weekend where it may be require adjusting your chain links to fit different gearing.
(AND more than likely even if your buying one to carry with you to the track the non Jumbo should be fine. But most people prefer to have a little heavier duty tool when at the track - just incase.)

For the person who is just changing an ocassional chain, the std one should be fine.

Both of the board sponsors should carry the parts you need for the conversion (including Chains, Sprockets & the chain tools).

If you have any questions or need help with anything, let me know. :thumbup

We do not have the chain tool online yet (its in there for the next update along with a ton of other tools - which should be tonight).

Anyway HTH :)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Great response Ranman. I was going to tell him to think about contacting you. One of the few times I didn't list both sponsors. :myfault
 
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