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2008 Triumph 675
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7,056 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ordered the adjusters from England about 2 weeks ago and they came in yesterday. These things are absolutely awesome and talk about saving time when changing the rear tire.

Took about 20 minutes to install both of them, (had to completely remove the screw that goes into the swingarm and has the 2 bolts for adjustment, and of course the axel, bolt and adjustment plates that normally just fall to the ground once the axel is out.) These things are just one complete unit and only require one allen head wrench to make any adjustments and thanks to have numbers on the side, you can ensure that the axel and tire are dead straight every time.

I took my tire off and put it back on again, leaving the brake caliper assembly in place, just took a flat head screw drive and widened the 2 pads to allow the brake disc to slide in more easily, and I was able to completely remove and put the tire back on in roughly 2 minutes, by myself.

 

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2008 Triumph 675
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7,056 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Here is the link:
Performancemotorcycleparts.com

And here's another link to read about them. Just scroll down to the adjusters. There isn't a whole lotta info out there.

http://www.bikehps.com/intermot/

Here's the e-mail from them when they shipped the parts to me:
PRODUCT (1)
PART NO: KTS-RJ05-BL / QTY: 1
DESCRIPTION: Gilles Chain Adjusters for 2003 Yamaha R6
UNIT PRICE: 125.00 * 1 = TOTAL PRICE: 125.00
CARRIAGE: 6.00

TRANSACTION DETAILS:
PRODUCT TOTAL: 125.00
CARRIAGE TOTAL: 36.00
LESS UK VAT @ 17.5%: - 23.98 **
GRAND TOTAL: 137.02
That total equates to roughly $250 dollars, and I got them within a couple of weeks. Not to bad considering you can't even buy them here in the States and they are full billet aluminum, and allow you to change you tire out quickly and adjust your chain very quickly with just an allen wrench. A good investment if you ask me. :D

I'll post pictures of my bike when I get home so you can see the blue anodized adjusters with the black swingarm. The blue kinda matches the front brake caliper pistons and the tops of the fork tubes.
 

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do the pegs bolt right on the top of say a pair of Pitbull stands?
 

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Aussie Race Fan
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They look great, maybe a bit overpriced, but a good product indeed. Might think about getting some after my rear shock arrives next week.
 

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I was hoping you'd get yours so I can ask you a few questions before I order mine. As far as removing the wheel, do you need to add slack to the chain like with the stock adjusters, basically is it easier to mount a rear wheel with this set up, for a quicker change I guess you can say. I have to admit they are fuckin sweet.
 

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2008 Triumph 675
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7,056 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
CWN, yeah I slacken the chain adjusters about 3 turns of the allen wrench on each side. Takes all of 10 seconds. Unscrew the axel bolt. Take chain off sprocket. Hit axel with rubber hammer. Pull axel out. Chain adjusters stay exactly where they are. Pull tire out, and use flat head screw driver to push rear brake pistons apart to make it easier to mount new rear. Put new rear in and line up brake disc with caliper, put foot underneath tire. Line up holes and push axel in. Put chain on, tighten axel bolt, then 3 allen head turns to tighten the chain adjsuters.

I'm serious, this shit is so much faster without having to look down the chain to ensure that everything is straight. No metal adjusters falling to the ground. No messing around with loosening and tightening those little nuts on the screw that goes into the swingarm. All that hassel is gone. I love these things! What did I ever do without them.
 

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I've never had to slacken the chain off to get the rear wheel out of my R6 (99 one). I leave the chain on and let the wheel drop down once the spindle comes out. Then the chain is loose enough for it to come off. Refitting is the same, fit the chain to the wheel then lift it into place and line it up with the adjuster holes etc. As I never use the rear brake I've put a chamfer on the pads to help the rear calpier assembly to drop into place too. Easier than fiddling with the stock adjusters.

The Giles adjusters do look trick though and much better for wheel adjustment if you change rear sprockets for gearing etc.

As an aside I help out with a team running a Gixer 1000 K3 (ex World Championship bike) in the UK Endurance Championship and the rear wheel change set up lets me do a rear change in maybe 20 seconds or less. Its a case of spindle removed with air gun, push wheel to forward position, chain off, wheel out, new wheel in to forward position, chain on, wheel pulled back into position and spindle back in. Quick pump of rear brake and off you go.

Easy peasy
 

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troy45 said:
I've never had to slacken the chain off to get the rear wheel out of my R6 (99 one). I leave the chain on and let the wheel drop down once the spindle comes out. Then the chain is loose enough for it to come off. Refitting is the same, fit the chain to the wheel then lift it into place and line it up with the adjuster holes etc. As I never use the rear brake I've put a chamfer on the pads to help the rear calpier assembly to drop into place too. Easier than fiddling with the stock adjusters.
I was gonna say the same thing. On my old 99, I didn't loosen the rear caliper or the adjusters to pull the wheel off. Just remove axel, let wheel drop, push forward and remove chain, pull wheel out. Reverse for installation. I'd you don't fuck around with the adjusters, it'll still be aligned. Only if I made a sprocket change would I fool with the adjusters. Took maybe 5 minutes to remove and reinstall.
 

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2008 Triumph 675
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7,056 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, don't be surprised if you see my chain adjusters on the Yamaha factory R6's or something very similar in the near future.

While I was at Willow Springs this weekend racing, the factory mechanics for Damon Buckmaster saw my bike in front of the Pirelli distributor and the chain adjusters were the first thing they noticed. They brought their digital camera over and took pics of both sides and asked were I got them.

I thought it was pretty cool that I had something that the factory boys didn't and I could tell that their interest was peaked.

I also got to see the inside of Damon's R6. The rear under the seat is friggin packed with electronics. And I mean packed!
 

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TZ,

Those are nice...But you should not have to loosen the chain to do a swap...Unless you are changing the sprocket. I am sure they make adjusting the chain easy though...Did you do the string check to see if they are accurate? Just curious as I have heard the OEM notches can be WAY OFF...

When I did the 200 in 2002, Steve and Co. had my wheel change down to less than a minute with no special tools...

I bet that was data acquisition equipment under his seat. They are not allowed to run it in AMA SS but were probably using it for testing only...

Take care and be safe!
 

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2008 Triumph 675
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7,056 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yeah, I did a tire change this weekend and I simply lowered the tire and pushed it forward to let the chain off. Don't know why, but until now I always loosened the chain first. Maybe it was because it made get the axel out easier. Just always did it that way on the F3.

Anyway, yes Mark, the OEM notches were both aligned, and each chain adjuster were set to the same #'s. Other than my fuel problem, the bike handled like a dream at Willow Springs. No complaints at all and the adjusters worked perfectly.

Not only did the Factory Yamaha guys ask about the adjusters, but I had other racers come by and comment on them, asking where I got them and the cost.
 

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WERA#39
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338 Posts
im just curious as to how well these things would hold up in a crash? for that kind of money, i'd hate to have to replace them.

The only problem i have with my 03 R6 that i didnt have with the 99 model, is that the damn brake caliper flops down and putting the tire BACK on the bike is a royal pain in the ass. I could do a front and rear wheel changeout on my 99 in less than 10 mins, but the rear on this 03 sucks major ass. WTF am i doing wrong?
 

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WERA42 said:
im just curious as to how well these things would hold up in a crash? for that kind of money, i'd hate to have to replace them.

The only problem i have with my 03 R6 that i didnt have with the 99 model, is that the damn brake caliper flops down and putting the tire BACK on the bike is a royal pain in the ass. I could do a front and rear wheel changeout on my 99 in less than 10 mins, but the rear on this 03 sucks major ass. WTF am i doing wrong?
I've started getting the hang of holding the brake caliper in the right hand, the wheel with the feet, and getting the axle through quickly. The only trick I remember is that there is a small area you can see on the inside of the swingarm where the brake caliper should go. Just hold it there the whole time and everything should line up.
 
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